Our Family History


You are currently anonymous Log In
 

Notes


Matches 351 to 400 of 719

      «Prev «1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ... 15» Next»

 #   Notes   Linked to 
351 headstone reads 1816 LADNER, Eloise (I2640)
 
352 Henrietta told her children that Guy Roberts was a merchant seaman who died in the 'Texas blast" before they were born. However, when Mary Ella Roberts turned 17, she found out her father had only just died and had been living in Port Arthur, Texas, where he had a wife and two children. ROBERTS, Guy (I792)
 
353 Her children taken as well MENEUX dit Chateauneuf (I2528)
 
354 Her parents died when she was wrong, and her grandparents raised her. She used their last name, "Krohn." HOLLEY, Ora Theresa (I3111)
 
355 Here is the record for the passenger. Click one of the links on the left to view material related to the passenger.


Skokandic, Petar

Austria, Dalmatian

Zronva, Austria

15 Jun 1911

44y

M

M

President Lincoln

Hamburg, Germany



Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1907. 18,168 gross tons; 616 (bp) feet long; 68 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw. Service speed 14.5 knots. 1,480 passengers (324 first class, 152 second class, 1,004 third class).
Built for Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1907 and renamed Berlin. Renamed President Lincoln in 1907. Hamburg-New York service. Laid up at New York in 1914. Seized by Leyland Line, British flag, in 1907 and named Scotian. Sold to US Government, in 1914 and renamed USS President Lincoln. Sunk in the Atlantic by a German U-boat on May 31, 1918. [722] 
SKOKANDIC, Pietro (Petar) (I4071)
 
356 Here we have information concerning Urbain Baudreau dit Graveline. This is taken from the Urbain Baudreau dit Graveline Genealogical Society website: http://www.ubgga.com/genealogy.php . Urbain’s father was Jean Baudreau dit Graveline born 25 June 1581 in Gravelines in Flanders. He married Marie Cheveau, born circa 1600, of France. The family name is Baudreau, the “dit Graveline” was a geographical “nickname” that the French would often use. Urbain was born 3 May 1623 in Clermont, Bourges, France, which is where he was living when he was recruited to go to Montreal.

The history of the Beaudreau and Graveline families began in 1653 with the arrival from France of a young man pioneer named Urbain Baudreau dit Graveline. Sailing form the small port of LaRochelle in France aboard a small vessel, a determined group of soldiers and adventurers began its perilous journey.

Urbain had signed a contract for five years to serve the colony of Montreal as a militiaman to protect it from the attacks of the dreaded Iroquois Indians. Following his discharge from his original contract in 1658, Urbain returned to France brieftly, but returned again in July of 1659 aboard the St-André.
Upon his return, he received from the owners of the colony, a land grant as compensation for his service. He decided to settle down and raise a family, so in 1664 he married Mathurine Juillet, the daughter of another colonial hero, Blaise Juillet, who had given his life in defense of the colony. Together they had eight children : four sons and four daughters.

During his early years in Ville-Marie, as Montreal was then known, Urbain worked as a landclearer for others in addition to working his own land. But, beginning in 1660, he began to acquire parcels of land on the shore of the St. Lawrence River. In 1663, he was elected syndic (trustee) of the colony, a position of some importance, though unpaid. He represented the other colonists in their dealings with the owners of the colony. His term lasted three years.

He lived a long and full life. Urbain passed away in 1695 in Montreal at about 70 years of age. He was buried in the cemetery adjoining the Church of Notre-Dame the next day. His children inherited their father`s sense of determination and adventure. The second son, Jean-Baptiste, was a soldier, businessman and adventurer who later became a pioneer settler along the Gulf Coast in the Mobile, Alabama area. Gabriel was a carpenter and businessman who, along with his wife, lost his life on a trip exploring the Mississipi River while they were searching for minerals. Paul, the third oldest son, stayed in the area of Montreal for most of his life. He married and had eight children who lived to adulthood. The youngest son, Jean (John), was a butcher, soldier, and farmer. He also married, had five children and lived in the Richelieu Valley region. BAUDREAU, Urbain dit Graveline (I1822)
 
357 Herman? BOSARGE, Sherman (I771)
 
358 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. KNEBEL, Anita Selema (I74)
 
359 His niece, Diane Lamas Lawson, said they have no photos of him "because he always turned and never wanted his picture taken." GUTIERREZ, Charles Henry (I45)
 
360 His parents were from Pennsylvania. FISHER, William (I2118)
 
361 His Will available at Mobile Courthouse, Mobile, Alabama. DUNWOODY, James (I4686)
 
362 Homesteaded land between Parker Creek and Tchouticabouffa River in Woolmarket known as Oaklawn. About 1825, Alexis built their home, which still stands today on a plateau overlooking the river. Family F1677
 
363 In 1654, his domain became a barony. DE BÉARN-BONASSE, Jacques Ier (I1123)
 
364 In 1852, John testified about the errors of the John James survey of 1841. BOSARGE, Jean Baptiste Sr. (I1259)
 
365 In 1866, the Harrison County Board of County Police granted John Steele a license to operate a pubic ferry across the Back Bay of Biloxi. About 1868, he assigned his ferry rights to Ramon J. Quave (1852-1908), who would become known as the “father of the village of Seymour (D'Iberville).” STEELE, John (I1320)
 
366 In 1870 census, his birthplace is given as “Italy.”
In 1880 census, his birthplace is given as “France.”

In the 1830s, immigrants from France, Spain, Germany, Croatia, and Switzerland began to discover the quiet waters of Back Bay. Why they came here may be never known. Most of the expatriates came through New Orleans and possibly were seeking political asylum and or the opportunity to make a fortune in a free land. Among these adventurers and dreamers were: Manuel Sanchez, Jose Santa Cruz, Francois Fountain, Henry Krohn, Bernard and Nicholas Taltavull, Joseph Abbley, Pierre Hervai (Harvey), Jules (Gilles) Saujon, Louis Boney, Stanislaus Beaugez, Antoine Bellande, Jacob Hosli, and John Baptiste Foretich.
--from Jackson County Genealogical Society article 
FORETICH, Giovanni (I183)
 
367 In 1880 Census, Margaret Bennett's mother is listed as born in North Carolina and her father as born in Georgia. WEST, Mary Annie (I301)
 
368 In 1910 census, George Duggan’s father’s birthplace is listed as “Scot. English”

1890 Veterans Schedule for Biloxi, MS lists a surviving veteran John Duggan.

1870 New Orleans census shows a 40-year old sailor from Ireland named John Duggan with a 1 year old son named George, and a wife named Sophia. Also listed is 4-year old son named John.

1850 New Orleans census shows a 23-year old from Ireland named John Duggan.


After the Civil War, he lived on Cat Island for a while and is mentioned in the book "History of Cat Island-Juan de Cuevas" as having survived a hurricane by holding onto a tree during the storm. 
DUGGAN, John M. (I815)
 
369 In 1954, he joined the U.S. Marine Corps and served two years, during which he was stationed in Parris Island, South Carolina, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, Cuba and Panama. He was honorably discharged as rank of Sergeant in 1956. He then worked in his father’s ice business until 1960, at which time he went into the janitorial supply business until 1969, when it was destroyed by Hurricane Camille. He then owned and operated a construction business until 1977, when he returned to family-owned business as Manager of Shrimp Packaging.

Member of Biloxi Elks Lodge #606, Biloxi Yacht Club and several carnival associations.

Obituary:

Frank Carroll Gutierrez, age 80 of Biloxi passed away on Wednesday, June 17, 2015 in Gulfport.

Mr. Gutierrez was born on September 18, 1934 in Biloxi, MS. He graduated from Notre Dame High School where his father was instrumental in building the new Catholic High School for boys that he attended. He attended The University of Southern Mississippi and Mississippi State University. He served his country in the United States Marine Corp. where he was a surveyor in the Fourth Battalion, Platoon 83 serving in the Central and South American Countries. He was always proud of his service to his country.

For many years he was active in many civic organizations including the Biloxi Jaycees where he served as President in 1962. He was also a member of the Biloxi Elks Lodge #606 and many seafood processing organizations. He belonged to Les Pierrots Carnival Organization, The Revelers Carnival Association and was a founding member of Les Badineurs Carnival Association.

He has been associated with the seafood business most of his life. He began as a young man delivering ice to the shrimp boats for his father’s ice company. He was co-owner of Sea Harvest and Sun Rise Seafood. Mr. Gutierrez was an entrepreneur and had many business ventures including Penguin Sales Company and Florentine Pools. In 1985 he purchased the old Biloxi City Barn on the corner of Bayview Avenue and Lee Street and together with his wife and sons, Brent and Clay, began a new family business called Cash Sales Company. That company evolved into Custom Pack, Inc. in 1988 and continues to operate today. In addition to designing a state of the art seafood processing facility, he pioneered the innovative IQF Technique of freezing shrimp. He and his family also are owners of Custom Cold Storage which serves the seafood industry.

He had many hobbies and enjoyed hunting with his sons and grandsons. He loved to travel and especially enjoyed trips to Mexico and Nicaragua where the family had business interests. He enjoyed fly fishing in Wyoming with friends and fished in the Road Runners Fly Fishing Tournaments for the past 15 years. For the last 19 years until he was 79 years old, he participated in the Tennessee River 600 riding a jet ski in the Tennessee and Alabama Rivers and lakes with his wife and friends to raise funds for the Children’s Miracle Network. Frank always loved cars and especially had an attachment to El Caminos. He also loved building cars for his sons to participate the Cub Scout Derbies. He enjoyed a special hobby of raising game fowl on his farm and through his hobby has made many lifelong friends throughout the county.

He was preceded in death by his mother, Catherine Gutierrez; his father Lee Gutierrez; three brothers, Lee R. “Pedro” Gutierrez , Henry “Duke” Gutierrez and Ramon “Ziggy” Gutierrez.

He is survived by his wife of 54 years, Anita Knebel Gutierrez; two sons, Brent Gutierrez and his wife Roianne and Clay Gutierrez; his five beloved grandchildren, Marissa Gutierrez, Grant Gutierrez, Raven Gutierrez, Chad Gutierrez and Dylan Gutierrez; many loving nieces and nephews; and his sister in law, Barbara Bosarge.

The Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated on Monday, June 22, 2015 at the Cathedral of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary from 12:00 PM, with a visitation for family and friends from 10:00 AM until the Mass. Burial will follow in Southern Memorial Park, Biloxi.

The family prefers memorial donations to The Children’s Miracle Network, 975 East Third Street, Chattanooga, TN 37403.

The RIEMANN FAMILY FUNERAL HOME, corner of Lemoyne Blvd and Washington Ave, Ocean Springs is serving the family. Tributes may be offered to the family and an online guestbook may be signed at www.riemannfamily.com 
GUTIERREZ, Frank Carroll (I10)
 
370 In April of 1933, Harry Truman, then a Missouri County Official, rented a house in Biloxi with his wife Bess and daughter Margaret. The Trumans became friends with the landlords Thelma and Willis Luxich. Mr. Truman wrote to the couple after their vacation, stating that the visit had helped Margaret's health. The house, referred to as "Sunshine Cottage," was located on the beach highway, where Treasure Bay casino is now located. In February of 1948, a few days before Mardi Gras, Mr. and Mrs. Luxich were visited in Biloxi again by now First Lady Bess Truman and Margaret, who were on their way to the Roosevelt Hotel in New Orleans for the parades. GUTIERREZ, Thelma Alphonsine (I41)
 
371 In Census of Acadia: 1693, A List of the Inhabitants of Port Royal and Their Cultivated Land, Their Livestock and Firearms, in "Acadian Census 1671-1752" translated by Charles C. Trahan, page 29;
"Jeanne auCoin widow (of Francois Girouard) 60; Julien Lord her son-in-law 41; Charlotte Giroud his wife 33; Alexandre their son 17; Jacque 14; Pierre 12; Marie 6; Magdeleine 1; 20 cattle, 40 sheep, 10 hogs, 20 arpents, 2 guns."

In Census of Acadia: 1700, List of Inhabitants of Port Royal, Their Families, Livestock, Cultivated Lands and Firearms, in "Acadian Census 1671-1752" translated by Charles C. Trahan, page 59;
"Jeanne auCoin, widow (of Francois Girouard) 87; Julien Lord her son-in-law 48; Charlotte Girouard 40; Allexandre 24; Jacques 21; Piere 18; Louis 5; Marie 13; Madelaine 8; Marguerite 2; 15 cattle, 34 sheep, 20 arpents, 2 guns."

From Pedigree #3845

Conflicting sources show her death as occuring in Loudun, France or Port Royal, Nova Scotia. 
AUCOIN, Jeanne (I1214)
 
372 in Gulf Hills BEAUGEZ, Palmyra (I2036)
 
373 In several halls of fame for footbal coaching and high school physical education and athletics SLAY, Joseph Lawrence (I366)
 
374 in Seymour Tomb; no headstone BONEY, Margaret Rose (I2631)
 
375 In the 1830s, immigrants from France, Spain, Germany, Croatia, and Switzerland began to discover the quiet waters of Back Bay. Why they came here may be never known. Most of the expatriates came through New Orleans and possibly were seeking political asylum and or the opportunity to make a fortune in a free land. Among these adventurers and dreamers were: Manuel Sanchez, Jose Santa Cruz, Francois Fountain, Henry Krohn, Bernard and Nicholas Taltavull, Joseph Abbley, Pierre Hervai (Harvey), Jules (Gilles) Saujon, Louis Boney, Stanislaus Beaugez, Antoine Bellande, Jacob Hosli, and John Baptiste Foretich.
--from Jackson County Genealogical Society article 
TALTAVULL, Nicholas (I2100)
 
376 In the 1830s, immigrants from France, Spain, Germany, Croatia, and Switzerland began to discover the quiet waters of Back Bay. Why they came here may be never known. Most of the expatriates came through New Orleans and possibly were seeking political asylum and or the opportunity to make a fortune in a free land. Among these adventurers and dreamers were: Manuel Sanchez, Jose Santa Cruz, Francois Fountain, Henry Krohn, Bernard and Nicholas Taltavull, Joseph Abbley, Pierre Hervai (Harvey), Jules (Gilles) Saujon, Louis Boney, Stanislaus Beaugez, Antoine Bellande, Jacob Hosli, and John Baptiste Foretich.
--from Jackson County Genealogical Society article 
FOUNTAIN, Francois (I2525)
 
377 In the 1830s, immigrants from France, Spain, Germany, Croatia, and Switzerland began to discover the quiet waters of Back Bay. Why they came here may be never known. Most of the expatriates came through New Orleans and possibly were seeking political asylum and or the opportunity to make a fortune in a free land. Among these adventurers and dreamers were: Manuel Sanchez, Jose Santa Cruz, Francois Fountain, Henry Krohn, Bernard and Nicholas Taltavull, Joseph Abbley, Pierre Hervai (Harvey), Jules (Gilles) Saujon, Louis Boney, Stanislaus Beaugez, Antoine Bellande, Jacob Hosli, and John Baptiste Foretich.
--from Jackson County Genealogical Society article 
BEAUGEZ, Stanislaus (I2639)
 
378 In the 1830s, immigrants from France, Spain, Germany, Croatia, and Switzerland began to discover the quiet waters of Back Bay. Why they came here may be never known. Most of the expatriates came through New Orleans and possibly were seeking political asylum and or the opportunity to make a fortune in a free land. Among these adventurers and dreamers were: Manuel Sanchez, Jose Santa Cruz, Francois Fountain, Henry Krohn, Bernard and Nicholas Taltavull, Joseph Abbley, Pierre Hervai (Harvey), Jules (Gilles) Saujon, Louis Boney, Stanislaus Beaugez, Antoine Bellande, Jacob Hosli, and John Baptiste Foretich.
--from Jackson County Genealogical Society article 
BONEY, Richard Louis (I3001)
 
379 In the 1841 land register, which is kept at the archives in Split, Vincenzo Foretich son of Giorgio owns two land plots with the numbers 598 and 644
 
598 is a house with two stories and one staircase “Casa d'abbitazione a due piani e scale”
644 is a house with one level and a workshop “Casa d'abbitazione d'un piano e economica 
FORETIĆ, Vinko (I218)
 
380 In the 1920s, worked in Plaquemine, Louisiana, and then in Shreveport. The family returned to Biloxi prior to birth of Melba Fay.

Beginning in the Depression, he worked for 26 years for Leo Ohr (son of famous potter George Ohr) in Ohr’s Machine Shop in Biloxi.

Worked at Ingalls Shipyard in Pascagoula, Mississippi, working on ship steering mechanisms, including the one on the first ship launched at Ingalls in 1940. 
FORETICH, Leo Vincent (I13)
 
381 Information obtained from her niece, Victoria Richards Stiglets, conflicts with dates on headstone. She gave Delphine's date of birth as October 17, 1859 and date of death as December 2, 1900. STIGLETS, Delphine Felicite (I313)
 
382 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. LAMADUE, Marcia (I124)
 
383 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. KRUMHOLTZ, Joan Marguerite (I118)
 
384 Introduced to her husband by her cousin, Anna Kitty “Darty” Layne, who worked in Butterfield Drugs. She told Cookie he could get his Coast Guard uniform cleaned at Slay’s Sunrise Dry Cleaners. When he did (it was 2 doors down), he met Lanette. SLAY, Lanette Eldred (I371)
 
385 Irish. NEWMAN, Frank E. Sr. (I4218)
 
386 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. BELICH, Dr. James Christopher (I3981)
 
387 Jean Baptiste Baudreau dit Graveline was born in 1671 in Montreal, the second son of Urbaine Baudreau dit Graveline and Mathurine-Marquerite Juillet. He served with Pierre Le Moyne Sieur D’Iberville in the Battle of the Hudson Bay against the British, and then accompanied D’Iberville on the expedition to the Gulf Coast. He arrived at Fort Maurepas in Biloxi on January 8, 1700 with d’iberville onboard La Renommee. In 1702 Graveline was at Ft. Saint Louis in Old Mobile, north of where the present city is. He became one of the wealthiest men in the colony by trading in furs, ships, and later cattle and agricultural goods. A couple of times he would buy a ship and load it down with goods and send it to Vera Cruz, the West Indies, or even to France for trading.

Graveline also traded frequently with the American Indian tribes in the area. In fact, he only had two documented children, both of which were half Indian. His first child was his daughter Magdeliene. She was never baptized in the church so there is no birth record, she is just recorded as “Magdeliene dit Pany Baudreau the natural child of Graveline and an Indian woman”, on her marriage certificate to Pierre Paquet II on 26 August 1726. Though there is no specific documentation it has been noted the mother of Magdeliene was an Indian woman that Graveline had been living with named Emashapa Panyouasas of the Choctaw nation. Her parents were Opehaw and Alpaha Panyouasas. Again, there is no actual documentation of this as far as I know. Apparently, on one of his trips to France, Graveline married a French woman, which may have been a Martha LaVergne, whom he married in 1710, however, she died in 1713 on Massacre Island, now known as Dauphin Island, Alabama. Then Louisiana governor Cadillac even mentions the death of “the wife of Graveline” in some of his official correspondences. Most researchers seem to think that an unwed Indian woman would not be mentioned in this manner so the deduction is that this wife was a French woman. The only true marriage record for Graveline is one dated 3 July 1727, wherein he married an Indian woman named “Susanne”, who was the mother of his son, notorious by many accounts, Jean Baptist Baudreau dit Graveline II (JB2). His son was ten years old at the time of this marriage and Graveline admits to only marrying Susanne in order to legitimize his son in the church. Iin summation, Graveline had three “wives”, the first Indian woman, Emshapa, the French woman who died, and then lastly Susanne. For the purposes of our discussion of the Quave family, we are most concerned with Graveline’s daughter, though there are many Quaves, including myself, who also are descended from Graveline’s son as well, all of the Quaves are at least descended from Graveline’s daughter Magdaliene.

After the death of Pierre Paquet II, Magdeleine Baudreau Paquet married Francois Alexandre Chenet dit St. Martin (1715-1789) in 1740. They had a daughter named Marianne who was born in 1742. Due to the nature of her mother being a widow, sometimes you may see Marianne listed as a Paquet or as a St. Martin. Regardless of whom her father was, she married Nicholas Ladner dit Christian, the third son of Christian Ladner and Marie Barbe Brunel, around 1758. Nicholas and Marianne lived on Cat Island, MS along with the rest of the Ladner family. Pass Christian and Pass Marianne in the Mississippi Sound are named after Nicholas and Marianne. Nicholas and Marianne had at least 11 children, one of the latter ones being Marie Helene who married a Spanish military man named Juan de las Cuevas, who met the Ladner family after having been sent to Cat Island as part of a reconnaissance group of soldiers. BAUDREAU, Sieur Jean Baptiste dit Graveline (I1820)
 
388 Jean was the son of Jacques Guyon and Marie Huet. Jean sailed from France on 14 March 1634 and arrived in New France 4 June 1634. His wife and most of his children did not arrive in New France until about l year later. His oldest daughter, Barbe, now married to Pierre Paradis did not arrive in New France until 1652. GUYON, Jean Marsolet Dion Sieur du Buisson (I1096)
 
389 Jean-Baptiste Baudrau-First permanent settler in western Jackson County    

Jean-Baptiste Baudrau (1671- ca 1762), dit Graveline, was born at Montreal in New France (Canada).  In 1700, he landed with Pierre Le Moyne, d’Iberville (1761-1706) at Fort Maurepas in present day Ocean Springs.  Iberville was a military commander sent by King Louis XIV (1638-1715) of France to establish and protect “La Louisiane”, the 1682 French claim of Rene Robert Cavalier de La Salle (1643-1687).  French Louisiana was defined by La Salle as the watershed of the Mississippi River and its tributaries.   
            
      In 1702, Jean-Baptiste Baudreau abandoned Biloxy, the region around Fort Maurepas. With his French cohorts, led by Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne, de Bienville (1684-1778), Baudrau relocated to Old Mobile. Circa 1718, Baudreau left Dauphin Island to return permanently to what is now Jackson County, Mississippi. He and his family resided on the west side of the Pascagoula River. (Adkinson, et al, 1991, pp. 95-98)

     Initially Graveline managed a farm in the present day Martin’s Bluff section. He raised livestock, primarily horned cattle. Graveline utilized Negro and Indian slave labor to work the plantation and tend livestock. (Conrad, 1970, p. 2 and p. 50)
    
Baudrau descendants

     The descendant of Jean-Baptise Baudrau are numbered in the tens of thousands. From this French Canadian adventurer, some of the first families of the Mississippi Coast, which still exist today, Ladner, Bosarge, Fayard, Moran, Grelot (Gollott), Fournier, Ryan, Bang, and Seymour, can trace some of their lineage.

     Jean Baptiste Baudrau dit Graveline had married an Indian woman who brought forth two children, Magdeleine Baudrau and Jean-Baptiste Baudrau II (d. 1757). Magdelaine married Pierre Paquet Jr. Circa 1758, their daughter, Marie Anne Pacquet (b. 1742) wedded Nicholas Ladner (b. ca 1736-1799) dit Christian. Of further interest in this line, Marie Angelique Baudreau (1776-1853), the daughter of Jean-Batiste Baudrau III (b. ca 1735) and Marie Louise Fayard (b. 1746), married Nicholas Ladner II (1759-ca 1793), son of Nicholas Ladner dit Christian and Marie Anne Pacquet. She married Jacob Bingle (Bang) after the demise of Nicholas Ladner II. (Cassibry II, 1988, pp. 700-704). [Believe Cassibry revises some of this in later edition. Need to verify, esp. re mother of Magdeleine.]

     The brother of Nicholas Ladner II, Pierre Ladner (1764-1809+), settled on the Pascagoula River in 1809, on Claim No. 133, which was one of actual settlers who had no claim from either the French, British, or Spanish Governments.  Pierre Ladner’s homestead was in Section 39, T6S-R6W about 1.5 miles east of the Evergreen community.(The American State Papers, 1994, p. 38)

      Jean-Baptise Baudreau II (d. 1757) married Marie Catherine Vinconnau. Their daughter Catherine Louise Baudreau (1742-1806) married Joseph Bosarge (1733-1794) of Poitiers, France in June 1762. They are the progenitors of the large Bosarge family of coastal Alabama and Mississippi. (Atkinson, 1991, p. 23)

     Another daughter of Baudrau II, Genevieve Baudrau, married Charles Leblanc in 1783. Their son, Joseph, born in 1788, became known as St. Cyr Seymour (1788-1845). His issue with Marie-Joseph Ryan (1786-1876) commenced the large Seymour family of our region. (Lepre, 1995 , pp. 54-61 )

      The Seymour family has its roots on the north shore of Graveline Lake in Section 5, T8S-R7W. Here the children of St. Cyr and Marie-Joseph made their livelihoods as subsistence farmers and stockmen in the same manner as their great great grandfather, Jean-Baptiste Baudrau dit Graveline. They left their family homestead to settle at Biloxi Latimer, Fort Bayou, Ocean Springs, and North Biloxi. (The Ocean Springs Record, January 15, 1998) 
BAUDREAU, Sieur Jean Baptiste dit Graveline (I1820)
 
390 John received his first U.S. Coast Guard license in 1940 at age seventeen. He joined the U.S. Navy soon after the attack on Pearl Harbor, where he became a signalman and gunner with the U.S.Armed Guard. The U.S. Navy Armed Guard was commissioned to protect the Merchant Ships crossing the Atlantic during World War II, and John served during seven successful convoy crossings of the North Atlantic. He also participated in the Invasion of Normandy, and Oran North Africa. He was also the recipient of the Purple Heart.

After World War II, John returned home to become a charter boat captain. In 1959, he became a bar and harbor pilot, guiding 5,969 ships to safe harbor through the Gulfport Ship Channel, to and from the Port of Gulfport. During his thirty-four years of service, John was instrumental in the fight to widen and deepen the Gulfport Ship Channel, which now allows for much larger vessels to navigate the port.

As owner of the Foretich Marine Contracting Company, and Gulf Marine Towing, along with his partnership with Gulfport Towing, John worked to build harbors and piers, transport goods, and provided marine salvage services across the entire Gulf Coast. He was president of the Gulfport Pilots Association, and a member of the International Organization of Masters, Mates, and Pilots.

John was past commander of the Military Order of the Purple Heart of America, member of the U.S. Navy League, Veterans of Foreign War, and Joe Graham Post of the American Legion. He was a 32nd degree mason, having joined the Gulfport Masonic Lodge in1953. He was a charter member of the Shiner Joppa Temple of Gulfport, Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, Order of the Eastern Star, Mississippi Coast Shrine Club, and a lifetime member of the Gulfport Elks Club #978.

--preceding paragraphs from obituary in The Sun Herald

"My Mom and Dad, Robert L. Rice III and Rosemary Foretich went on a double date.... Dad bringing his sister, Rose Margaret Rice. (TeTe) and Mother bringing her brother John Foretich.  Both couples married and had 7 children and a set of twins too!  Though TeTe lost a newborn in the hospital from suffocation.  Anyway, so this makes John and TeTe's children my double first cousins.  At least that is what we have always called each other."

Ship pilot for Gulfport; he brought the big ships in and out of the harbor. 
FORETICH, Capt. John McCleland (I910)
 
391 Justice of the Peace in Jackson County, 1824-27. Member of the Mississippi legislature. SEAMAN, Benjamin (I2428)
 
392 Kept Foretich name upon marriage. FORETICH, Rita (I4784)
 
393 killed in a hurricane as a small child.

sure it was a separate child or could it have been Anna Evelyn Slay? 
SLAY, Name unknown (I344)
 
394 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. LOPEZ, Helen Olivia (I1972)
 
395 killed in Civil War FAYARD, David Travine (I254)
 
396 known as “Rebecca”

Third wife of John Baptisté Foretich

She and her twin brother George appear in 1850 census records of Harrison County, Mississippi. 
WELLS, Louisa Rebecca (I184)
 
397 Lady of high estate, descended from a branch of the house of Foix. DE BÉARN-BONASSE, Isabeau (I1122)
 
398 Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity COLLEE, James Russell Jr. (I164)
 
399 land now bounded on Nixon St. to west and Bellman Ave. to east CARCO, Jean Baptiste (I1361)
 
400 Langley Point GROUE, Louis Sr. (I3096)
 

      «Prev «1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ... 15» Next»