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1 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. TIBLIER, Christopher Corey (I31)
 
2  DUGGAN, Odile (I753)
 
3  BOSARGE, Leander (I781)
 
4  MATTINA, Roy Nicholas Anthony Sr. (I798)
 
5 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. MURRAY, Tabatha Staylnn (I818)
 
6 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. FORETICH, Drew T. (I920)
 
7  DUGGAN, Frank John Jr. (I1129)
 
8 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. MAYGER, Mary Elizabeth (I1141)
 
9  DUGGAN, Kim M. (I1155)
 
10 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. BATES, Jade Marie (I1455)
 
11  BENNETT, Venus Elizabeth (I1519)
 
12  MCCONNELL, Amantha Raye (I2708)
 
13 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. PITALO, Deborah Lynd (I2896)
 
14 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. NEWMAN, David (I4270)
 
15  BRYANT, Mitch (I4277)
 
16 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. LANE, Kecia Rose (I2578)
 
17
Slay family researcher Elizabeth Casburn Brown, explaining why she thinks Calvin is the father of James Lawrence Slay, Sr.:

"I have also been working on finding parents for Epsy Caroline Slay.  One message that I had said that her mother remarried a man named Helton.  I found John Helton and his wife Millie A (sometimes listed as Mary) with their children Lawrence J, Epsy and Onelia living in Baldwin Co AL 1870. I have always thought that your James Lawrence was most likely Epsy’s brother, Lawrence J.  Espy’s death records shows that her parents were Millie Enfinger and Calvin Slay.  All of Epsy’s family stayed in the Baldwin Co area and so did Millie.  There is a Calvin Slay in my files who was born in 1825 and was the son of Nathan Slay Jr 1795 and Mary S Powell 1793 but nothing is know about him at this time.  Nathan and his family settled in Choctaw Co AL.  I don’t know if this is the right Calvin 1825 or if it could be his son.  The name Calvin is used in Epsy’s family as well as James Lawrence’s.  I admit it’s not proof positive but it is the best link we’ve had so far and enough so that it requires further digging.  Calvin either abandoned his family which I doubt or died before February 4 1866 which is when Millie married John Helton in Baldwin Co." 
SLAY, Calvin (I4773)
 
18
The McPeters family dropped the Mc and were later known as Peters. One of her children was born in Biloxi, MS. 
PETERS, Elizabeth D. (I1285)
 
19 --obituary in Biloxi newspaper

Mrs. Jency Chatham, aged 78, died at the home of her daughter Mrs. Carrie Dugan on Back Bay Sunday night at 9 o'clock. A son Andrew Chatham and two daughters survive her Mrs. Carrie Dugan and Mrs. Sarah Smith. The remains will be interred under direction of Undertaker Gleason today.
[note] died Nov 6 1898, daughter of John Creel Sr 1802 and Kizziah Dearman  
CREEL, Jencey (I4697)
 
20 LADNER, Joseph dit Joseph Nicholas Ladner (I2292)
 
21 ?? need further research Lucinda (I1303)
 
22 "[He] was always an ardent worker in Catholic circles. He was a member of St. Vincent de Paul Society and visited the sick and needy. He was also a member of the Holy Name Society and the Catholic Order of Foresters, and was an usher at St. Stephens Church." --obituary WEBB, James Oliver (I36)
 
23 "alive for the 7/7/1800 census and provision made for his welfare in marriage contract of Docitte and Marguerite Babin" RICHARD, Valentin (I4349)
 
24 "Back Bay" TIBLIER, Vital (I2042)
 
25 "Grandma Mae wanted to name him Patrick Henry and Grandpa Charlie said no. So they named him Allan Joseph (which turned into Allen Joseph) but called him Pat."--Barbara Foretich Harriel on Facebook, January 15, 2010 FORETICH, Allen Joseph (I912)
 
26 "He delivered papers [for the Miami Herald] in his Model T Ford. It was called the dawn-breaker," said daughter Lynn Walker French. "He used to tell us how the feds chased him because they thought he was a moonshiner."

While working as a carrier, he crushed his right foot in a motorcycle accident.

The accident eventually led to him leaving The Herald to work at Kerr Farms in Homestead, where he learned about the tomato business. During the early 1950s, he started his own tomato business in Perrine. It was named the Big W Farm.

"As the business expanded, he added the Herman Walker Tomato Co. as the packing end of the business and kept the Big W Farm as the farming end of the business," French said.

He retired in 1990 when he sold the business. The name, Herman Walker Tomato Co., remained.

Walker received numerous awards throughout the years for his contributions to South Florida agriculture. He received a commendation from Dade County in 1990 and a proclamation in May 1991 from Gov. Lawton Chiles. "He was extremely thrilled and very honored," said French. "He said he thought his parents would be proud of him."

After his retirement, he was awarded the Dade County Farm Bureau Hall of Honor Award for his contribution to Dade County agriculture. Three months ago, he received the Dade County Pioneer Agriculturist Award.

Walker was also past charter member of the South Miami and Perrine Rotary clubs, a member of the Homestead/Florida City Chamber of Commerce and vice-chairman of the Florida Tomato Committee for 10 years. 
WALKER, Herman Leo (I570)
 
27 "Mali" was another surname that I found was used for the family in the records. I have seen from trying to make connections in from the recrods that sometimes the alternate surnames in Dalmatian names are not alternate spellings or the name translated from one language to another but are instead something completely different. The alias surnames/nickname surnames/ alternate surnames or whatever one calls them that I have seen in the records usually seem to be quite different from one another. "Mali" in Croatian means smal, by the way.----Katherine Arbanasin, reseracher of Foretich family genealogy, January 29, 2013 BOTER, Jacobus (Mali) (I5072)
 
28 "Massacre Island" LAVERGNE, Martha (I2331)
 
29 "Maw Maw [Lottie Duggan] told me that her mother once lived in the Old Brick House, and that when she lived there some officials tried to get her to sign up to take money because she was part Indian.  I suppose that could have been a scam. She refused to do it."--C. Paige Gutierrez, by email to HJG, 2/26/2015 BENNETT, Mary Ella (I748)
 
30 "My Mom and Dad, Robert L. Rice III and Rosemary Foretich went on a double date.... Dad bringing his sister, Rose Margaret Rice. (TeTe) and Mother bringing her brother John Foretich.  Both couples married and had 7 children and a set of twins too!  Though TeTe lost a newborn in the hospital from suffocation.  Anyway, so this makes John and TeTe's children my double first cousins.  At least that is what we have always called each other."

I know she sang on the radio once or twice. Always the star. 
FORETICH, Rosemary (I909)
 
31 "My Mom and Dad, Robert L. Rice III and Rosemary Foretich went on a double date.... Dad bringing his sister, Rose Margaret Rice. (TeTe) and Mother bringing her brother John Foretich.  Both couples married and had 7 children and a set of twins too!  Though TeTe lost a newborn in the hospital from suffocation.  Anyway, so this makes John and TeTe's children my double first cousins.  At least that is what we have always called each other." RICE, Rose Margaret (I1587)
 
32 "She was a faithful member of St. James Catholic Church for 50 years, served on the St. James Altar Society and was a Red Cross volunteer at Keesler Medical Center for 12 years."--Sun Herald online obituary VOIVEDICH, Vivian Marie (I2835)
 
33 "Sherry had a very selfless attitude, and put everyone else's priorities before her own, even through her time of illness. She attended soccer games instead of receiving treatment and missed trips to the doctor to spend Christmas with her family. Her strength was shown through every aspect of her life. She preached her philosophy on giving a 100% effort, and that anything is possible. Her faith was contagious, and her message reached far beyond her friends and family, even affecting the lives of complete strangers who were inspired by her courageous and meaningful life. To some, she was a mother, to others she was a friend, but to everyone, she was an angel." VENUS, Sherry Ann (I1617)
 
34 "The Widow Fayard" LADNER, Angelique dit Christian (I2071)
 
35 "VENUS-TALTAVULL"

"Joe Venus and Miss Maggie Taltavull, two of Biloxi's well known young people, were married in this city at the Church of the Nativity, Rev. Father Finley officiating. The wedding was a very quiet one; only the immediate members of the family and a few close friends were present. Willie Collins acted as best man and Miss Victoria Venus, sister of the bride, was the bridesmaid. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Venus and the bride is the daughter of Frank Taltuvall. Shortly after the ceremony the newly married couple left for New Orleans, where they will spend a short honeymoon." 
Family F525
 
36 "When I think of my great-grandmother I always picture her in a starched & ironed dress with a pretty pin pinned near her neck. She was one of the neatest & cleanest persons that I've ever known. [She] would always make us wash our feet before we got in the bed (even if we had just had a bath)" -- Deborah Pitalo Snyder, Facebook post, May 15, 2011 DUGGAN, Lenora (I786)
 
37 “Married a Mexican woman and adopted her many children.” BILLS, Scott (I1446)
 
38 ◦ Peter Dewey Fountain called Dewey, the father of Pete Fountain, was also a talented musician. He was born at St. Martin, the son of Raymond Fountain and Adonia Groue. Dewey met and married Madeleine Letort of New Orleans. They resided in the Crescent City after their wedding there in 1926. Pete Foutain was born at New Orleans on July 3, 1930, and would spend summers on the "east end" with his St. Martin family, FOUNTAIN, Peter Dewey (I4755)
 
39 1,20 (or 620?) Bagatelle Street (now Bourbon) GUTIERREZ, Dolores (I4470)
 
40 1667 Census declares him as living on Charlesbourg at the age of 44 years.
"On 22 Feb 1671 Guillaume Fournier, from the St Charles area of Quebec offered (Jean Prou) 150 livres for his property..."
"Charlotte de Poitiers should have inherited the som of 1660 livres from her first husband after having her marriage contract reviewed by the Sovereign Council in 1663. The money seems to have gone to her in-laws, Guillaume Fournier and Francoise Hebert who, by way of compensation, offerend her 11 arpents of cleared land in the Grande-Alee...feeling that she had been cheated Charlotte bought suit against her relatives before the S.C. on 26 Jan 1664. On 11 Nov 1668, a special commission was named to estimate the real value of the 11 arpents; it made a report on 27 Mar 1670 decreeing that the land was worth but 525 livres. In order to make up for the missing 1,000 livres, Simon and Charlotte asked the heirs of the Hebert family to relieve them in perpetuity of all rents, both in silver and in capons, on their concession on the St-Charles river. The council found this offer to be reasonable and approved it in a judgement rendered on 14 Apr 1670.
"In his catalogue of immigrants, the historian Marcel Trudel mentions that Guillaume was among those to arrive in a fleet in 1651, the first ship of which arrived on August 18." 
FOURNIER, Guillaume (I1422)
 
41 1746 per St. LNO bb II : 1 23 PAQUET, Marie Anne dit Magdelaine (I1813)
 
42 1840 census
Prior Bennett Jasper, Mississippi

Mississippi census 1805-1890

Prior Bennett MS Jasper County No Township Listed 1841

Prior Bennett MS Jasper County No Township Listed 1845
-----------

U.S. General Land Office Records 1796-1907
Name State Issue Date Meridian County Township Range Section
Prior Bennett
Mississippi 5 Jan 1841 Choctaw Jasper 1-N 12-E 29

Prior Bennett
Mississippi 5 Jan 1841 St Stephens Jasper 10-N 11-W 1

Prior Bennett
Mississippi 5 Jan 1841 Choctaw Jasper 1-N 12-E 17

Prior Bennett
Mississippi 5 Jan 1841 Choctaw Jasper 1-N 12-E 30

Prior Bennett
Mississippi 5 Jan 1841 Choctaw Jasper 1-N 12-E 29

Prior Bennett
Mississippi 5 Jan 1841 Choctaw Jasper 1-N 12-E 32
----------
Mississippi Land Records
[There are more listed under his name.]

Name: Prior Bennett
Land Office: AUGUSTA
Document Number: 2507
Total Acres: 80.57
Signature: Yes
Canceled Document: No
Issue Date: 5 Jan 1841
Mineral Rights Reserved: No
Metes and Bounds: No
Statutory Reference: 3 Stat. 566
Multiple Warantee Names: No
Act or Treaty: April 24, 1820
Multiple Patentee Names: No
Entry Classification: Sale-Cash Entries
Land Description:
1 W1⁄2SW CHOCTAW No 1N 12E 29
Source Information:
United States, Bureau of Land Management. Mississippi Land Records [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 1997. Original data: United States, Bureau of Land Management. Mississippi Pre-1908 Patents: Homesteads, Cash Entry, Choctaw Indian Scrip and Chickasaw Cession Lands. General Land Office Automated Records Project, 199 
BENNETT, Prior (I4165)
 
43 1860 Census of Harrison County, Mississippi has Daniel, age 9, living with his father and 3rd wife Rebecca Wells FORETICH, Daniel (I251)
 
44 1870 census DUGGAN, George (I546)
 
45 2007-07-19
Here is the tale about the new Orleans funeral.
The link at bottom takes a minute to load, but should give you the NPR piece. Freeman 
Dear Friends, old and new, and family,

             In the hope this will be of interest, I thought you would enjoy a small summary about the Commemorative Funeral my Creole kinfolks gave to my gruesomely executed ancestor Jean Baptiste Baudrau II. I have just returned from this "jazz funeral" march through the French Quarter. National Public Radio covered the event. The audio link below takes afew moments to load, so be patient...

            Attached is a profile believed to depict Jean Baptiste Baudrau II [1717-1757], my Gulf Coast, half-Native American, ancestor. He holds a ceremonial feather.             His father, JB Baudrau dit Graveline, was the most successful member of the Founding Party of the Louisiana Colony. He made his first fortune trading pelts with the Choctaw and Muscogee (Creek) peoples of today’s Mississippi and Alabama. He made his 2d fortune trading in cattle with the Spanish of Havana and Vera Cruz.            His wife was “the daughter of a great Chief of the Indian nation,” and they produced one son, our executed ancestor.            Jean Baptiste Baudrau II was an agent of his father, and a famous up-country frontiersman for the French around Mobile, which was one of the early colonial capitols. He was fluent in several native tongues, and highly regarded, especially among the Alabamon Creeks. Historical accounts say Jean Baptiste served as go-between on numerous occasions in the rescue of French captives, sometimes pledging his own pelts to redeem captives’ lives. He was a well-regarded citizen of the colony.            He was also something of a wildcat. The French Gov. Vaudreuil charged him with rum smuggling to the Spanish at Pensacola. When he ran away with his mistress to Havana, trumped up kidnap charges saw him thrown in prison in New Orleans in the early 1740’s. He broke out after four months, and fled to the protection of his Indian people. The villages were located south of present day Montgomery. The Indians refused to trade with the French for five years until he was pardoned, and Vaudreuil finally petitioned the king of France to revoke the kidnap charges.            Vaudreuil wrote that “the respect of the Indians for Baudrau is to be feared. He is known to be brave, enterprising and well liked by all of the tribes. I favor pardon since his intentions were not bad… (This single man) is said to possess more knowledge of this continent than (all the other) French and the Indians.”            In the mid 1750’s, Jean Baptiste was convicted of illegal salvaging of Spanish wrecks, and imprisoned on Cat Island, off Biloxi. Coincidentally, its garrison mutined against a martinet commander, and forced Baudrau to escort them across hostile territory to English Georgia and freedom. The new Louisiana governor, Kerlerec, had only been in office 2 years, and must have seen the rap sheet on Baudrau. In response, he insidiously sent Baudrau’s own 2 sons to Mobile carrying a sealed arrest order for their father, then subjected our ancestor to a brief summary trial.            Documentation available today suggests Baudrau was indeed not guilty of participating in the mutiny. The odious nature of his death [breaking on the wheel, decapitation, quartering the body, display of the parts on the public refuse heap in New Orleans, and disposal into the Mississippi], created a deep sense of shame, humiliation and outrage on the part of his wife, mistress, half-sister, and 6 children.            The sorrow and opprobrium connected with this intergenerational transmission of trauma has been passed across the centuries. Our funeral upon the 250th anniversary of his execution was designed to bring long-delayed honor to a forgotten American hero, a skilled frontiersman who resembled later Daniel Boone or Jim Bowie, and to set his unburied soul to rest. The lines created by his Fayard, Farve, Seymore, Bosarge, Fontaine, Moran, Tannette, Dedeaux, Ladnier, Baptiste, Bang, Ryan, Lord, Lewis and other descendants runs to thousands of Americans alive today.            Nearly 100 of them joined together for a 2-hour jazz funeral procession through the Vieux Carre on June 10, 2007. Afterwards, to the ringing of bells and beating of Indian drums, they consigned a rememberance wreathe of rosemary, and the written prayers of many for Jean Baptiste, into the Mississippi River across from Jackson Square, the site of his horrible death.
            Thanks for your interest in this unusual tale from old Louisiana history.
            With greetings and good wishes...            
F reeman "Hobs" Allan – Crozet  VA 434-242-4718

  2007-03-13
Dear Eloise, (and Norman)
    
Thanks for a thorough update. Now it is up to our next generation to carry on, and keep the fires kindled.
M. Randall Ladnier sent me the email below to the VIEUX CARRE COMMISSION in New Orleans:

My half-Indian ancestor was executed in front of St. Louis Cathedral on June 07, 1757. At the time, he owned a small log home on the corner of Rampart and Ursulines in the Vieux Carre. This summer will mark the 250th anniversary of his death.

He was executed (together with a French soldier) by "death on the wheel", having been convicted three hours earlier at a "Council of War" on a charge of aiding a mutiny which had occurred on Cat Island earlier that year. This event has been described in gruesome detail by Governor Kelerec in his letter to the King's Minister, Peirine de Moras, October 02, 1757.

My ancestor's death provoked public outrage in France, in the Colony of Louisiana, and among the Indian Nations of Mississippi and Alabama who considered him a great hero. This outrage may have contributed to France's adoption of the guillotine in 1792 as a more "humane" form of execution. Clearly my ancestor is the only native-born American to have died on the on the infamous French "wheel".

In addition to his being the direct ancestor of such famous persons as Pete Fountain and Jimmy Buffett, he is the great, great, ... uncle of Brett Favre, Hale Boggs, and Cokie Roberts.

He was the illegitimate son of Jean Baptiste Baudrau dit Graveline, a Canadian who had served with d'Iberville when they defeated the English at Hudson's Bay and accompanied him to Louisiana in 1700. Before the 1717 Hurricane decimated his cattle herds at Dauphin Island and Pascagoula, M. Graveline was considered the wealthiest man in the Colony.

Jean Baptiste Baudrau certainly rebelled against the French administrators of Louisiana. He was reprimanded for smuggling homemade rum to the Spanish at Pensacola. He had the gall to collect some of the cargo from a sunken Spanish ship when it washed up on Cat Island. But in 1757 he was something of a hero to the poor settlers of Louisiana who were just trying to survive despite French abuse and neglect.

He is certainly a hero to the many thousands of descendants who live in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama today. His ancestors would like to place an historical marker in or near Jackson Square to commemorate the 250th anniversary of his death.

Please contact me in this regard. I can provide you with many more historical facts that support our belief that he was an important figure in the history of Louisiana.

Randall Ladnier
Sarasota, Florida
Tel: 941-925-7157

These letters are from the UBGGA Web Site.  www.ubgga.com 
BAUDREAU, Jean Baptiste dit Graveline II (I1266)
 
46 6 miles north of Bayou LaBatre BOSARGE, Jean Baptiste (I1903)
 
47 A census of 1698 shows four children living with him and his wife on Cléoncoré Island. D'AMOURS, René de Clignancour (I1941)
 
48 A lovable person who became a legend in Biloxi. She went from one family to another when she was needed to help with chores, child care, cooking or cleaning. This petite lady made a picturesque figure with a kerchief around her head covering her grey hair, which was fixed in a queue. She always carried a little bundle of clothes on a stick and wore a neatly ironed apron.

In the 1930s, she went to live at the home of the Little Sisters of the Poor in Mobile, Alabama.

-------------

Louise "Meeche" Carco (Carqoute, Carcaux, Kerqoute), the daughter of Jean Baptiste Carco and Gertrude Fournier, is a legend in Biloxi History. After her parents died, she lived with different relatives and was a very loveable person. She was called "Cousin Meeche" by everyone. "Cousin Meeche" was my 2X great aunt and was born in 1844. She was a great help around Biloxi and went from family to family, as she was needed, to help with chores, care of children, cook or clean. This petite lady made a picturesque figure with a kerchief around her head covering her grey hair, which was fixed into a queue. She always carried a little bundle of clothes on a stick and wore a neatly ironed apron. In the 1930's "Meeche" went to live at the home of the Little Sisters of the Poor in Mobile, Alabama and died on September 11, 1939. She was buried in Mobile. "Meeche's" became one of the favorites many Mardi Gras revelers costumed themselves after, with groups of people dressed as her marching in the Mardi Gras Parades. 

I myself remember dressing up as her when we would play around the house. It must have been from seeing them dressed as her in the parades. 
CARCO, Louise (I2107)
 
49 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. BRCIC, Abel (I3601)
 
50 aboard vessel "Le Marie" LADNER, Christian (I1401)
 

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